Waste-to-energy facility highly impossible for the Philippines – Experts

Marje Pelayo   •   July 3, 2018   •   11772

An MMDA personnel during a clean-up drive at Estero de Magdalena in Manila collects garbage that clogs the city’s waterways.

 

PASAY CITY, Philippines – The National Solid Waste Management Commission in 2016 recorded an average daily collection of over 40,000 tons of waste materials in the country.

To date, the volume of garbage being collected every day is continuously increasing with the National Capital Region as the largest source of domestic wastes.

Debates on how the Philippines can achieve zero-waste status are ongoing as well as whether or not the government would put up a waste-to-energy facility in the country.

This is in consideration of environmental advocates and experts’ claim that facilities like incinerators and waste-to-energy plants both produce toxic fumes that are harmful to human health and would definitely damage the environment.

 “Incinerators and the newer versions of waste to energy plants all produce the most poisonous and toxic substances,” said Dr. Jorge Emmanuel, an energy technology specialist from Siliman University.

 

Environmental advocates

 

Also, the Clean Air Act clearly prohibits the use of incinerators.

Senate Committee on Energy Chair Senator Sherwin Gatchalian said his Committee has been pushing for a number of proposals regarding waste disposal in the country.

The Senator, however, admitted that a large-scale facility for waste to energy conversion is highly impossible for the Philippines, noting that the process would require amendment of the existing laws aside from the high cost of the facility’s installation and overall operation.

“Ang waste to energy will be impossible to implement here in the Philippines primary because of economics,” he concluded. – Nel Maribojoc / Marje Pelayo

 

Gatchalian eyes probe on COVID-19 impact on PH basic education

Robie de Guzman   •   May 8, 2020

MANILA, Philippines – Senator Sherwin Gatchalian on Friday said he has filed a resolution seeking an inquiry into the impact of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) on the basic education system in the country.

In a statement, Gatchalian said he filed Senate Resolution No. 391, which aims to probe and assess the crisis’ impact on schools and help identify recovery and transition measures that would create a sustainable and resilient education system in time of emergencies.

Gatchalian, who chairs the Senate committee on basic education, arts and culture, said the COVID-19 pandemic not only interrupted learning for the country’s more than 28 million students as it also aggravated the plight of vulnerable and marginalized learners and the existing disparities within the education system.

He added that students confined to their homes face other risks such as poor nutrition, mental health problems, and increased exposure to violence and exploitation.

“Hindi lamang natin sisikaping makabangon ang ating sistema ng edukasyon mula sa naging epekto ng COVID-19, kailangan nating patatagin ang kakayahan ng ating mga paaralan na ipagpatuloy ang pagbibigay ng dekalidad na edukasyon sa panahon ng mga krisis at sakuna,” Gatchalian said.

“Higit sa lahat, kailangan din nating ihanda nang maigi ang mga mag-aaral sa tinatawag na new normal na sistema ng edukasyon,” he added.

The Department of Education earlier announced that School Year 2020-2021 will open on August 24.

Gatchalian said learning from home would probably become the new normal for students, parents and teachers amid the COVID-19 crisis.

He also noted the Department of Education’s (DepEd) preparations for the shift to other learning platforms and tools such as online, radio, television, and printed materials to reach all learners.

Gatchalian also acknowledged the need to help private institutions.

Citing data from the Coordinating Council of Private Educational Associations, he said more than 409,757 private school teachers and personnel are receiving either reduced or no pay because of school closures.

Around 15.5 percent of elementary and high school students are enrolled in private schools, Gatchalian said.

Gatchalian says home-based learning may be ‘new normal’ in upcoming school year

Robie de Guzman   •   May 6, 2020

MANILA, Philippines — Learning from home may become the “new normal” for millions of students when school year 2020-2021 opens in August, Senator Sherwin Gatchalian said on Wednesday.

In a statement, Gatchalian, who chairs the Senate committee on basic education, arts and culture, said that the Department of Education (DepEd) should use every platform to ensure the continued education and safety of more than 27 million learners amid the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) crisis.

He said the mix of digital, low-tech, and no-tech methods will help DepEd reach all learners, especially those in the far-flung areas without access to the internet.

Since not all learners have connectivity and available gadgets for online-based learning, the senator said that television and radio will be key to reaching more learners nationwide.

“Marami pa rin sa ating mga mag-aaral sa buong bansa ang hindi nakakagamit ng internet, kaya malaki ang potensyal ng radyo at telebisyon upang maipagtuloy natin ang edukasyon sa loob ng ating mga tahanan,” Gatchalian said.

“Sa pagpasok ng SY 2020-2021, mahalagang magamit natin lahat ng paraaan upang maipagpatuloy ang edukasyon ng ating mga kabataan at mapanatili ang kanilang kaligtasan,” he added.

The lawmaker also proposed that the number of subjects under DepEd’s Learning Continuity Plan be reduced only to core subjects amid the health crisis situation.

He also suggested that the time leading to the opening of classes on August 24 should be spent on preparing teachers, parents and learners on using different tools for home-based learning.

The DepEd earlier said it is studying various modes of learning for students depending on the situation in their areas. Its guidelines will be released when finalized.

Bill seeking to institutionalize alternative learning system gets Senate nod

Robie de Guzman   •   May 4, 2020

MANILA, Philippines – The Senate on Monday approved on third and final reading a bill seeking to institutionalize the alternative learning system (ALS) and establish an ALS community learning center in every locality in the country.

During its first “hybrid” session, the upper chamber passed the Senate Bill 1365 of the ALS Act with 22 affirmative votes.

The Senate resumed its session on Monday with 15 senators physically present while seven attended the hearing through teleconference.

Senator Sherwin Gatchalian, head of the Senate committee on basic education arts and culture and the bill’s principal author, said putting up ALS centers in every community will give more Filipinos outside the formal school system a second chance to complete their basic education.

He also said that the measure reflects the need for continued education amid the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) crisis as the bill seeks to utilize a mix of learning modalities such as digital learning, modular instruction, and radio and television-based instruction to help ensure the safety of learning under the “new normal.”

Gatchalian said that the ALS is the Department of Education’s (DepEd) parallel learning system for those who cannot access formal education due to economic, geographic, political, cultural, and social barriers, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples, children in conflict with the law, persons deprived of liberty, migrant workers, and other marginalized sectors of the society.

He added that in 2019, there were 738,929 learners enrolled in ALS.

In comparison to the formal education system, ALS is a non-formal education that happens outside the classroom, community-based, usually conducted at community learning centers, barangay multi-purpose halls or at home at an agreed schedule and venue between the learners and learning facilitators for free.

“The ALS Act is, in its very essence, a bill about second chances. It is a bill about providing opportunities for a better life to our fellow Filipinos who have fallen into hard times,” Gatchalian said in a statement.

Citing World Bank’s May 2018 Philippines Education Note, Gatchalian said that at least 24 million Filipinos aged 15 and above have not completed basic education.

The same report said that an additional 2.4 million children aged 5 to 14 were not in school.

“Kung bawat lungsod o munisipyo sa bansa ay magkakaroon ng ALS Community Learning Center, mas madali nating maaabot at mabibigyan ng dekalidad na edukasyon ang bawat Pilipinong napagkaitan ng pagkakataong tapusin ang kanilang pag-aaral,” the senator said.

“Malaking hamon ito para sa lahat ng stakeholders lalo na’t pinaghahandaan natin ngayon ang tinatawag na new normal sa muling pagbubukas ng eskwela,” he added.

The proposed bill also seeks to strengthen the ALS Teacher Program to address the shortage of ALS teachers and facilitators.

It also mandates the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) and the Civil Service Commission (CSC) to create teaching positions for ALS teachers.

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