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UNTV underwater drone: A new first in Philippine broadcast

by Marje Pelayo   |   Posted on Thursday, February 7th, 2019

MANILA, Philippines – UNTV pioneered drone journalism in the Philippines in 2013 during the onslaught of Typhoon Yolanda.

Viewers were given a picture of the devastation in a different perspective uncommon to traditional news reporting.

Through the years, UNTV has shown the public the beauty of different places in the Philippines; the extent of damages brought about by illegal mining; the massive fires; the raging volcanoes and other important events in the country.

This year, UNTV has set another milestone in Philippine broadcast industry with the use of a Remotely-Operated underwater Vehicle (ROV) drone.

This can be used in exploring the beauty of aquatic bodies and the problems that water creatures are suffering as a result of urbanization.

Such is the case in Manila Bay when UNTV explored its seabed to reveal the extent of the damage in its underwater environment.

During UNTV’s Digital Interactive Broadcast, the station’s drone journalism chief Argie Purisima described how the underwater drone struggled during its exploration in Manila Bay.

Ang makikita nyo po sa seabed is puro burak. Maraming mga basura. Katunayan nga, pag-ahon ng drone natin, lahat po ng elesi natin, itong tatlong elisi, punong puno ng basura. Puro mga plastic, (What you can see on the seabed is pure mud. A lot of trash. In fact, when the drone emerged, all its blades were tangled with trash, plastic trash,)Purisima said.

UNTV’s underwater ROV drone can go up to 150 feet underwater.

In Manila Bay, it was able to reach 10-feet deep but the environment was already zero visibility.

Mayroon diyan kuha akala mo corals, parang corals na mga basura. Then iyong iba, burak talaga (In one shot, it looked like corals, corals made of trash. The rest was mud),” he added.

UNTV drone journalism is the brainchild of the company’s
chief executive officer (CEO), Daniel Razon who has contributed a number of innovations in the Philippine broadcast industry.

UNTV is proud to be the only TV station that was given three licenses by the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines (CAAP) in June 2015:

*Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPAS) Controller Certificate of Registration (license for drone pilots)   

*Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPAS) Certificate of Registration (license for drone units)    

*Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPAS) Operator Certificate of Registration (company license)     

These certificates attest that all drone units of UNTV are safe to use and can be used for commercial purposes like in news broadcasting. – Marje Pelayo (with reports from Rey Pelayo)

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World’s longest electric vehicle trip ends in New Zealand

by Robie de Guzman   |   Posted on Sunday, July 21st, 2019

Dutch adventurer Wiebe Wakker posing beside his vehicle the ‘Blue Bandit’, to celebrate the completion of his three-year drive across more than 30 countries in an electric vehicle. | Courtesy: Reuters

A Dutch sustainability advocate completed the longest ever journey in an electric vehicle in New Zealand on Friday (July 19) after a three-year drive that took him through more than 30 countries.

Wiebe Wakker set off from the Netherlands in March 2016 in his “Blue Bandit” to showcase the potential of sustainable transport, funded by donations from those following his trip on social media.

“So I wanted to do my bit to promote this technology and show that sustainability is a viable way of transport. So I wanted really to do something that really speaks to the imagination which is driving an electric car from Amsterdam to literally the other side of the world to show that it can be done,” he said.

The 101,000 kilometers (62,800 miles) trip took Wakker through Eastern Europe, Iran, India, Southeast Asia, before traveling around much of Australia and across to New Zealand.

Wakker gave regular updates on his blog and social media throughout the journey, detailing visiting Iran’s biggest car manufacturer in Tehran, a breakdown on the Indonesian island of Java and visits to Australia’s outback and world-famous Uluru.

The drive had relied on the support of strangers across the globe who offered the traveler food, a place to stay and the essential means to charge his car along the way. (REUTERS)

(Production: James Redmayne)

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South Koreans boycott Japanese brands and cancel trips as diplomatic row intensifies

by Robie de Guzman   |   Posted on Saturday, July 20th, 2019

Angry South Korean consumers are taking action after Tokyo imposed curbs on exports to South Korea, promoting a widespread boycott of Japanese products and services, from beer to clothes and travel.

“We decided to cancel (the trip to Japan) because it went against our beliefs. I’m actually feeling relieved,” said Lee Sang-won, a 29-year-old designer, who canceled his Japan trip for a 130,000 won ($110.15) fee.

Screenshots of Japan trip cancellations are trending on social media. Lee and his friends, who have changed their holiday destination to Taiwan, ‘proudly’ presented their canceled ticket to Japan on his social media account.

“I believe it is very significant for South Korean citizens to show them (the Japanese government) their thoughts and actions. These boycotts are not about how much economic damage we can inflict, but about how we can raise their awareness,” said Lee, scheduling his trip to Taiwan with his friend.

Diplomatic tensions have been simmering again since a South Korean court last year ordered Japanese companies to compensate South Koreans who were forced to work during the war. Then on July 4, Japan restricted exports of high-tech materials to South Korea, denying the move was related to the compensation issue. Tokyo cited “inadequate management” of sensitive exports, with Japanese media reporting some items ended up in North Korea. Seoul has denied that.

Meanwhile, some local supermarkets pulled Japanese beers off the shelves, which was their way of taking a stance against Japan as a quickly worsening political and economic dispute between the two East Asian neighbors rekindles lingering animosity since Japan’s World War Two occupation of Korea.

“Of course we should (boycott Japanese products). There are so many good, tasty products, domestic and overseas alike, so why bother (consuming Japanese products) when we have this problem with Japan?” said a 55-year-old South Korean customer at a local market where he can’t find Japanese beers, said he has plenty of other options which can replace Japanese products.

Economists say the tech export curbs could shave 0.4% off South Korea’s gross domestic product this year. The boycott – if it proves to be more than just a brief burst of nationalistic fervor – could marginally add to that, unless consumers spend on something else.

“We are pleased to see this has turned consumers’ favor towards our pens,” said Park Seol, assistant manager at stationery maker Monami, whose online sales have risen five-fold since the curbs.

Japan’s Fast Retailing fashion brand Uniqlo, which sells clothes worth around 140 billion yen – 6.6% of its revenue – in 186 Korean stores, is also feeling the anger as its chief financial officer said last week there was a certain impact on sales. (REUTERS)

(Production: Daewoung Kim & Heejung Jung)

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Pentagon removing Turkey from F-35 program after its purchase of Russian missile defense

by Robie de Guzman   |   Posted on Friday, July 19th, 2019

F-35 Fighter Jet | Courtesy: Lockheed Martin / Reuters

The United States said on Wednesday (July 17) that it was removing Turkey from the F-35 fighter jet program, a move that had been long threatened and expected after Ankara began accepting delivery of an advanced Russian missile defense system last week.

The first parts of the S-400 air defense system were flown to the Murted military airbase northwest of Ankara on Friday, sealing Turkey’s deal with Russia, which Washington had struggled for months to prevent.

“The U.S. and other F-35 partners are aligned in this decision to suspend Turkey from the program and initiate the process to formally remove Turkey from the program,” said Ellen Lord, the Undersecretary of defense for acquisition and sustainment.

Used by NATO and other U.S. allies, the F-35 stealth fighter jet is the world’s most advanced jet fighter. Washington is concerned that deploying the S-400 with the F-35 would allow Russia to gain too much inside information of the stealth system.

“The F-35 cannot coexist with a Russian intelligence-collection platform that will be used to learn about its advanced capabilities,” the White House said in a statement earlier on Wednesday.

Washington has long said the acquisition may lead to Turkey’s expulsion from the F-35 program.

The Pentagon had already laid out a plan to remove Turkey from the program, including halting any new training for Turkish pilots on the advanced aircraft. (REUTERS)

(Production: Labib Nasir)

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