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Samsung Electronics to reveal Galaxy Note 7 probe results ‘very soon’

by UNTV News   |   Posted on Friday, January 6th, 2017

File photo.

File photo.

Samsung Electronics America’s President and Chief Operating Officer Tim Baxter said on Wednesday the South Korean company was doing everything to make sure the problems with the Galaxy Note 7 do not reoccur and said the results of a probe into the smartphone fires will be made public ‘very soon.’

“As you know, this year was a challenging year for Samsung. Some of you were directly impacted and certainly many saw the media coverage, especially about the Note 7. We continue our intensive efforts, internally and with third party experts to understand what happened and to make sure it does not happen again. And very soon we will be sharing the root cause report on the Note 7,” Baxter said.

It was reported on Monday that Samsung would announce, this month, the results of an investigation into what caused some of its Galaxy Note 7 smartphones to catch fire.

The South Korean firm said in October it was examining all aspects of the phone, suggesting there may be a combination of factors that contributed to one of the costliest product safety failures in tech history.

The world’s top smartphone maker warned of a $5.1 billion hit to its operating profit over three quarters following its decision to permanently halt Galaxy Note 7 sales in October.

Investors and analysts have said it is critical for Samsung to identify the root cause of the fires in order to rebuild consumer trust and avoid repeating the same mistakes. — Ninya Armillo | UNTV News & Rescue

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Watchdogs! The strays trying to keep Thai streets safe

by UNTV   |   Posted on Tuesday, September 5th, 2017

Meet the four-legged furry friends chosen to test run a prototype ‘smart vest’ which could turn stray dogs into heroes by spotting potentially unfriendly strangers and other dangers within a community.

“Our philosophy at work is to show how creativity and technology can be used together to help solve problems for the people or society,” said Satit Jantawiwat, chief creative officer at Chiel.

A hidden camera is attached to the collar of a dog’s vest and activated when its sensors detect aggressive barking noises, sending a live streaming video of what the dog saw in front of them to a central location.

The Phuket-base Soi Dog Foundation, a group formed over a decade ago to save street dogs and cats in Thailand, welcomed the initiative but deemed the vests to be in an early ‘trial and error’ stage.

“It’s too early a stage to actually say how practical the vests are. We really don’t know how they’re going to work. So, it’s going to be trial and error. We’re also going to be on a steep learning curve at the start and then we will iron out differences as we move forward,” said Soi Dog Foundation managing director Martin Turner.

The project began in March 2017 and the Cheil company said there will be more development before the project is introduced for a full trial run in the community. — Kath Dumaraos | UNTV News  & Rescue

 

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Why parents’ tech obsession may mean kids misbehave

by UNTV News   |   Posted on Friday, June 2nd, 2017

FILE PHOTO: A man uses a smartphone in New York City, in this picture taken November 6, 2013. REUTERS/Mike Segar

(Reuters Health) – Parents who are constantly checking their phones for texts, emails and cat videos may be more likely to have kids who misbehave than people who are able to step away from their screens, a small U.S. study suggests.

Researchers examined survey data from parents in 170 families with young children and found mothers and fathers who were more likely to report being distracted by technology during playtime were also more likely to see behavior problems in their kids.

“Prior studies have shown us that some parents can be quite absorbed by their devices and that when they are absorbed it seems like it is difficult for children to get their attention,” said lead study author Brandon McDaniel of Illinois State University in Normal.

“No prior studies however had linked parent technology use, especially use that interrupts or interferes with parent-child interactions, with child behavior problems specifically,” McDaniel added by email. “What is especially new here is that even minor, everyday intrusions of technology that are likely happening to all of us that have and use smartphones can begin to influence our children’s behavior.”

For the study, researchers analyzed data from surveys completed separately by 168 mothers and 165 fathers from two-parent households.

Among other things, the surveys asked about how often smartphones, tablets, laptops and other technology disrupted family time with interruptions like checking phone messages during meals or answering texts in the middle of conversations. Parents were also asked to rate how problematic their personal device use was based on how often they worried about calls or texts and whether they thought they used mobile devices too much.

While both mothers and fathers thought technology use distracted from interactions with their children at least once a day, the women perceived their phone use as a bigger parenting problem than the men.

About 48 percent of parents reported technology interruptions at least three times a day, while 24 percent said this happened twice a day and 17 percent said it occurred once daily. Only 11 percent said technology never interrupted family time, the study team reports in Child Development.

Researchers also asked parents to rate the frequency of child behavior issues within the past two months by answering questions about how often their children whined, sulked, easily got frustrated, had tantrums or showed signs of hyperactivity or restlessness.

After adjusting for other factors that can influence kids’ behavior such as parent income and education level and other family dynamics, researchers found an association between parents’ belief that their technology use was disruptive and parents reporting that kids had behavior issues like tantrums, whining or hyperactivity.

The study wasn’t a controlled experiment designed to prove how or if parents’ technology use changes the way kids behave. Other limitations include the lack of clinical data or reports from teachers or other adults to verify that kids had behavior problems.

It’s also possible that parents who turn to technology more often during family time are doing this to take a break from kids with behavior issues, said Dr. Sam Wass, a developmental psychologist at the University of East London in the UK who wasn’t involved in the study.

“It could be that children who are naturally more restless or hyperactive are more likely to have parents who ‘need a break’ from their children from time to time – and it is this that causes the association,” Wass said by email. “This link is very far from proven.”

Still, parents worried about how technology disrupts their family time can try to carve out periods of each day when the devices go away and they focus only on their kids, said Larry Rosen, professor emeritus at California State University, Dominguez Hills.

“Children crave a connection to their parents and learn from their parents’ behaviors,” Rosen, who wasn’t involved in the study, said by email. “Constantly checking your phone is going to have a negative impact on this connection.” — By Lisa Rapaport

SOURCE: bit.ly/2rciUsr Child Development, online May 10, 2017.

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Samsung unveils Galaxy S8 smartphone

by UNTV News and Rescue   |   Posted on Thursday, March 30th, 2017

South Korean tech giant Samsung Electronics lost to its rival Apple in the smartphone scene after the embarrassing withdrawal of the fire-prone Note 7S.

Now, it is back with a bang.

Boasting some of the largest wrap-around screens ever made, Samsung’s long-awaited Galaxy S8 is finally unveiled.

“This is a big one, and Ithink that Samsung had a lot to prove — and I think they did. I mean I haven’t used the phone for extended period of time but what I’ve seen so far is very positive,” said Patrick Moorhead, president and principal analyst of Moor Insights & Strategy.

Two versions of the Galaxy S8, code-named ‘Dream’, internally, were launched at a media event here in New York on Wednesday: 6.2-inch and 5.8-inch curved screens – the largest to date for Samsung’s premium smartphones.

“We spent a little bit of time about the new battery suit safety program they had, which I think was a good thing, but I think to consumers, if it’s a great phone, that’s going to just fade into the background,” Moorhead said.

The phones, which will go on sale on April 21, are slightly longer but comparable in width to their predecessors as Samsung has eliminated nearly all of the bezel borders around the face to maximize the screen surface area.

The S8 features Samsung’s new artificial intelligence service, Bixby, with functions including a voice-commanded assistant system similar to Apple’s Siri. — UNTV News and Rescue

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