Resistance exercise may help stave off heart, diabetes risks

UNTV News   •   July 10, 2017   •   6382

FILE PHOTO: An 82-year-old resident does push-ups with two fingers during his exercise beside Houhai Lake in central Beijing February 8, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee/Files

(Reuters Health) – Middle aged adults who do even a small amount of regular strength training exercise may be lowering their risk of so-called metabolic syndrome – itself a risk factor for both heart disease and diabetes, a recent study suggests.

People with at least three unfavorable health stats from a list that includes large waist size, high blood pressure or triglycerides, high blood sugar or low “good” cholesterol are said to have metabolic syndrome, and are at increased risk of going on to develop diabetes, heart disease or both.

But researchers found that when generally healthy people did strength-building exercise for less than an hour a week they had 29 percent lower odds of developing metabolic syndrome than their peers who did no resistance exercise.

“You already get health benefits with even a low amount of resistance exercise per week, which is good news for people with a very busy lifestyle,” said lead author Esmee Bakker of Radboud University Medical Center in Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

An estimated one-third of U.S. adults have metabolic syndrome, the authors write in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Although previous studies have reported how aerobic exercise, such as running, walking and swimming, reduce metabolic syndrome, few studies have looked at resistance exercise alone.

The U.S. government’s Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans suggest that adults should do “muscle-strengthening activities that are moderate or high intensity and involve all major muscle groups on 2 or more days a week” and aerobic exercise 150 or more minutes each week.

“A modest amount of resistance exercise, such as two 30-minute sessions per week, has beneficial effects,” Bakker told Reuters Health by email. “We think that resistance exercise, in addition to aerobic exercise, should be included in standard medical recommendations to prevent metabolic syndrome.”

Bakker and colleagues analyzed data on more than 7,400 people who participated in medical examinations at the Cooper Clinic in Dallas, Texas, between 1987 and 2006. They ranged in age from mid-30s to mid-50s at the time of their examinations.

The research team found that 1,147 participants, or 15 percent, had developed metabolic syndrome during the follow-up period. Meeting the resistance exercise guideline of two or more days per week reduced risk of metabolic syndrome by 17 percent overall, compared to doing no resistance exercise. Those who met both aerobic and resistance training guidelines had a 25 percent lower risk of developing metabolic syndrome.

“This result was independent of other healthy behaviors, such as not smoking,” Bakker said. “It also made little difference if people did resistance exercise only on weekends or spread throughout the week.”

Bakker and colleagues plan to study the effect of resistance training on other health outcomes, such as the heart health benefits of a one-year resistance exercise training program. They also want to examine the long-term effects of different types and intensities of strength training on metabolic syndrome.

“The real next step is to see how we can get people to exercise,” said Paul Thompson of the University of Connecticut in Hartford, who wasn’t involved with the study.

“We can talk about the right dose and intensity, but it’s clear that in most studies, doing something is better than nothing,” he told Reuters Health by phone. “Most people do nothing, and the key is to get them to do anything.”

One limitation of the study is that it relies on self-reported survey data, which could bias the results. Thompson also cautions that some patients of the Dallas clinic are relatively more affluent than the rest of the country, so the results might not apply more generally.

“The increasing American girth has increased metabolic syndrome, which leads to insulin resistance and makes it harder for insulin to work,” he noted.

Thompson is studying how exercise affects people who have a tendency toward metabolic syndrome and ways they can work against a genetic disposition toward diabetes and hypertension, for example.

“Everybody should have some exercise,” he said. “Play with the dog or grandkids, do yard work or go for a walk. Just do something for 30 minutes every day.” — By Carolyn Crist

SOURCE: mayocl.in/2sKzwK5 Mayo Clinic Proceedings, online June 14, 2017.

Filipina scientist knighted in the Netherlands

Aileen Cerrudo   •   April 28, 2021

A Filipina scientist has been awarded a Knighthood in the Netherlands in recognition of her tireless dedication in promoting The Netherlands relations with the Philippines.

The Embassy of the Netherlands in the Philippines has announced that Ambassador Saskia de Lang honored Dr. Mary Ann Pelagio Sayoc by awarding her a Knighthood in the Order of Orange-Nassau.

“I am very proud to announce that it has pleased His Majesty King Willem-Alexander to award a Knighthood on a leading personality of the Dutch-Filipino community. It is a recognition of exceptional merit to The Netherlands,” she said in conferring the knighthood to Sayoc.

𝗡𝗲𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿𝗹𝗮𝗻𝗱𝘀 𝗔𝘄𝗮𝗿𝗱𝘀 𝗞𝗻𝗶𝗴𝗵𝘁𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗱 𝘁𝗼 𝗙𝗶𝗹𝗶𝗽𝗶𝗻𝗮 𝗔𝗴𝗿𝗶-𝗮𝗱𝘃𝗼𝗰𝗮𝘁𝗲

MANILA, Philippines (April 26, 2021) – Ambassador Saskia de…

Posted by Embassy of the Netherlands in the Philippines on Monday, April 26, 2021

The statement said Dr. Sayoc has significantly contributed in realizing efforts aimed at transforming Philippine agriculture and boosting productivity of local farmers. She also headed various organizations that boosts the ties between the Philippines and the Netherlands.

The Order of Orange-Nassau is awarded to individuals for longstanding meritorious service to society. AAC

DA issues import ban on bird products from Altforst village, The Netherlands

Marje Pelayo   •   November 11, 2020

MANILA, Philippines – The Department of Agriculture (DA) on Tuesday (November 10) issued a temporary ban on the importation of domestic and wild birds and their products originating from the village of Altforst in the Dutch province of Gelderland, the Netherlands.

According to DA, a veterinary report from the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality in The Hague said there is an outbreak of H5N8 highly pathogenic Avian Influenza in the area affecting parent broiler stock poultry.

Thus, the ban also covers poultry meat, day old chicks, eggs and semen coming from the said village, the DA said.

In line with this, the processing, evaluation of application and issuance of Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) import clearance for the above products is also suspended.

Meanwhile, all incoming poultry meat shipments with SPS import clearance issued on or before October 30 will be allowed entry provided that the frozen poultry meat has a slaughter date of 21 days prior to the start of the outbreak on October 8.

All shipments that do not comply with the veterinary quarantine protocols will be confiscated.

The importation ban has taken effect on November 6 as signed by the DA Secretary William Dar.

Philippines to seek help from Dutch gov’t for extradition of Joma Sison

Robie de Guzman   •   September 13, 2019

Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP) founding chairman Jose Maria “Joma” Sison

MANILA, Philippines – The Philippine government will seek a special arrangement with the Dutch government for the extradition of exiled Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP) founding chairman Jose Maria “Joma” Sison, the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG) said.

“The government will seek a special arrangement with the Dutch Government for the extradition of Joma Sison,” DILG Secretary Eduardo Año said in a statement on Thursday.

“On the grounds that his ‘refugee status’ is no longer tenable because he participated in the commission of crimes and other criminal acts as determined by the Regional Trial Court which renders him effectively ineligible,” he added.

In 1992, the Netherlands recognized Joma as a “political refugee” on the basis of his alleged persecution by the Marcos regime.

Año criticized Sison, saying he must be “hallucinating” for supposedly claiming that he is “absolutely protected” in his self-imposed exile in the Netherlands as a so-called political refugee.

“Ang isang kriminal ay hindi kailanman puwedeng ituring na political refugee. Ang isang mass murderer ay hindi puwedeng maging refugee. Buking ka na, Joma, kaya panagutan mo ang mga kasalanan mong pagpatay sa mga kapwa mo Pilipino,” Año said.

(A criminal can never be considered a political refugee. A mass murderer can never be a refugee. You are busted, Joma, so you better face your crimes of murdering fellow Filipinos.)

Sison and 36 other members of the CPP-New People’s Army (NPA) are the subjects of a warrant of arrest issued by a Manila Court on August 28 in relation to a murder case for the discovery of a mass grave in Inopacan, Leyte in 2006 that purportedly contained the bones of the victims of a mass killing by the New People’s Army in the 1980s. 

Año further taunted Sison, calling him a “coward for hiding from the charges against him in a foreign country and living there like a king.”

“Duwag ka, Joma (You’re a coward, Joma). Now that you are in the last few years of your life, do something right for a change, own up to your sins against the Filipino people and face the charges against you and give justice to the victims of the Inopacan massacre, among many others,” the DILG chief said.

Año claimed Sison continues to direct “his terrorist forces” in the Philippines through public statements directing the New People’s Army “to kill and plunder in the countryside.” 

“This fact has been established when the United States, the European Union, and the Duterte Administration declared the CPP/NPA as a terrorist organization,” he said.

The Philippine National Police (PNP) and the Armed Forces of the Philippines earlier said they are closely coordinating with the International Police (INTERPOL) for the issuance of a Red Notice for Sison’s arrest.

READ: AFP to work with DFA, DOJ, Interpol for arrest of Joma Sison

Año said that once the INTERPOL publishes a red notice, Sison will become a wanted man all over the globe.

The DILG chief also the Philippine government is currently working with the European Union to have Sison’s so-called refugee status in The Netherlands revoked as soon as possible. The Netherlands is part of the European Union.

“Wala ng rason pa para kanlungin pa ng Netherlands si Joma dahil ang Pilipinas at ang EU mismo kung saan kasapi ang Netherlands ay nagsasabing isang terrorist organization ang CPP na pinamumunuan ni Sison,” he stressed.

(The Netherlands no longer has a reason to shelter Joma because the Philippines and no less than the EU itself, where the Netherlands is part of have said that the CPP led by Sison is a terrorist organization.)

Año said initial talks with the EU deputy ambassador were positive with the latter committing to help the Philippine government in this matter.

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