Republicans fail again to kill off Obamacare in US Senate

admin   •   September 27, 2017   •   2371

IMAGE_UNTV_NEWS_092717_TRUMP

For the second time in two months in a serious defeat for President Donald Trump’s domestic agenda, the Republicans failed in their attempt to kill the controversial “Obamacare.”

“Well, today Americans breathe a sigh of relief because the health care of millions has been protected and preserved. We, Democrats, believe this is not a day for celebration, but a day to roll up our sleeves and work to make the health care system better than it is today,” said Senate Minority Leader Senator Chuck Schumer.

The party was unable to win enough support from its own senators for a bill to repeal the 2010 healthcare law and decided not to put it to a vote, several Republicans said.

The latest failure to carry through on a seven-year effort to roll back the 2010 healthcare law is an embarrassing setback for Republicans.

“We haven’t given up on changing the American health care system. We are not going to be able to do that this week, but it still lies ahead of us, and we haven’t given up on that,” said Senate Majority Leader Senator Mitch McConnell.

Trump vowed frequently in the 2016 election campaign to scrap Obamacare, the signature domestic policy of his Democratic predecessor, Barack Obama.

The Republicans may now struggle to achieve any major domestic policy successes in Congress this year, and they could be punished for it by voters at the November 2018 midterm elections. — Reuters

 

Democrats say summary of Trump’s call with Zelenskiy raises more questions than answers

Robie de Guzman   •   September 26, 2019

Democratic members of the U.S. Congress were not satisfied by the White House summary of a phone call between U.S. President Donald Trump and Ukranian President Volodmyr Zelenskiy, suggesting the document raises more questions than answers about Trump’s efforts to exert pressure of Zelenskiy to open an investigation on Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden.

“The release of the transcript of one of President Trump’s calls with President Zelenskiy, which just came out, will not assuage our concerns or the public’s concerns. Based on early reports, it may heighten them,” Senator Chuck Schumer, the Democratic leader, said.

Hakeem Jeffries, the Democratic leader in the House of Representatives, said the role of Trump’s attorney, Rudolf Giuliani, as a back-channel interlocutor to the Ukrainian government is particularly disturbing to Democrats.

“That is lawless. That undermines our national security. That is an abuse of power. That is unpatriotic. That undermines the electoral process and our democracy and the American people will not stand for it,” Jeffries said. (Reuters)

(Production: George Tamerlani)

Status still unclear as Trump announces ease of trade ban vs Huawei

Aileen Cerrudo   •   July 5, 2019

Courtesy : Reuters

The status of Huawei in the United States market remains unclear after President Donald Trump announced plans to ease the trade ban against the Chinese company.

President Trump made the statement last week during the G20 Summit in Japan.

“We mentioned Huawei, I said we have to save that till the very end, we’ll have to see….One of the things I will allow however is, a lot of people are surprised, we send and we sell to Huawei a tremendous amount of product that go into the various things that they make, and I said that, that’s okay that we will keep selling those products,” he said.

However, despite the announcement, White House Economic Adviser Larry Kudlow said Huawei will remain blacklisted.

“Remember, Huawei remains on the enemy list, which is fundamentally a national security issue,” he said.

Meanwhile, trade talks between the US and China will continue next week to resolve a year-long trade war.—AAC (with reports from Mon Jocson)

Trump, Obama tout clashing visions of U.S. as elections near

UNTV News   •   November 5, 2018

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Barack Obama (R) greets President-elect Donald Trump at inauguration ceremonies swearing in Trump as president on the West front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Barack Obama made dueling election appearances on Sunday, offering sharply different views on the country’s problems but agreeing on the high stakes for voters in the final 48 hours of a tight campaign.

With opinion polls showing dozens of tight U.S. congressional and gubernatorial races in Tuesday’s election, the current and former presidents said the results would determine what kind of country Americans live in for the next two years.

“This election will decide whether we build on this extraordinary prosperity we have created,” Trump told a cheering crowd in Macon, Georgia, warning that Democrats would “take a giant wrecking ball to our economy.”

Trump campaigned with Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp, who is in a tight race with Democrat Stacey Abrams for the governor’s office.

Obama condemned Trump, without addressing him by name, and Republicans for what he described as their divisive policies and repeated lies. He hammered Trump and Republicans for repeatedly trying to repeal his signature healthcare law while at the same time claiming to support the law’s protections for those with pre-existing conditions.

“The only check right now on the behavior of these Republicans is you and your vote,” Obama told supporters in Gary, Indiana, during a rally for endangered Democratic Senator Joe Donnelly.

“The character of our country is on the ballot,” he said.

Trump and Obama are the most popular figures in their parties, and their appearances on the campaign trail are designed to stoke enthusiasm among core supporters in the late stages of a midterm congressional election widely seen as a referendum on Trump’s first two years in the White House.

Opinion polls and election forecasters have made Democrats favorites on Tuesday to pick up the 23 seats they need to capture a majority in the U.S. House of Representatives, which would enable them to stymie Trump’s legislative agenda and investigate his administration.

Republicans are favored to retain their slight majority in the U.S. Senate, currently at two seats, which would let them retain the power to approve U.S. Supreme Court and other judicial nominations on straight party-line votes.

In the midst of a six-day national blitz of rallies ahead of Tuesday’s election, Trump will also appear later on Sunday in Tennessee, which hosts a vital U.S. Senate race.

HARD-LINE RHETORIC

In the final stages of the campaign, Trump has ramped up his hard-line rhetoric on immigration and cultural issues including warnings about a caravan of migrants headed to the border with Mexico and of liberal “mobs.”

He repeated those themes in Georgia, urging voters to “look at what is marching up – that’s an invasion.” He said Democrats encouraged chaos at the borders because it was good politics.

Ronna McDaniel, head of the Republican National Committee, said on ABC’s “This Week” program that the media had chosen to focus on Trump’s immigration rhetoric but the president was also emphasizing economic and job gains under his presidency.

The Labor Department on Friday reported sharply better-than-expected job creation in October, with the unemployment rate steady at a 49-year low of 3.7 percent and wages notching their best annual gain in almost a decade.

But in Indiana, Obama said Republicans were taking credit for the economic renewal that started under his presidency. “You hear those Republicans brag about how good the economy is, where do you think that started?” he asked.

Obama also appeared later on Sunday in his old home state of Illinois, which hosts a competitive governor’s race and several tight U.S. House of Representative races. Obama’s appearance on the campaign trail is his second in three days.

In the battle for the Senate, Democrats are defending seats in 10 states that Trump won in the 2016 presidential election, including a handful that he won by double digits.

U.S. Senator Chris Van Hollen, who heads the Democratic Senate campaign arm, said it was “remarkable” that Democrats were even in striking distance of capturing the Senate given the unfavorable map they faced.

“The fact we still have a narrow path to a majority is a sea change from where we were two years ago,” he said on ABC. “These are some very close races and they are in states where Trump won big.”

As of Sunday morning, almost 34.4 million people had cast ballots early, according to the Election Project at the University of Florida, which tracks turnout. That is up 67.8 percent from the 20.5 million early votes cast in all of 2014, the last federal election when the White House was not at stake.

For all Reuters election coverage, click: here

Reporting by John Whitesides; Editing by Lisa Shumaker and Susan Thomas

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