Real-life Paddington Bear cub rescued in Peru after mother killed

admin   •   December 13, 2018   •   3088

Rescued bear cub | REUTERS

An orphaned spectacled bear was rescued in Peru, after locals reportedly killed his mother and left the 8-month old cub tied to a tree, officials reported.

According to Peru’s environment body SERFOR, the cub was rescued in the rural area of Huancayo. It is believed that his mother was killed after posing a threat to nearby cattle farms. The cub was spared but left tied to a tree and abandoned.

The cub is now receiving round-the clock care. Weighing only six kilos (13 pounds), it was found with signs of anemia, suffering from dehydration and with injuries to its paws.

The spectacled bear is the only bear native to South America.

The World Wildlife Fund says as few as 6,000 spectacled bears may live in the Northern Andes, and that hundreds are hunted down each year in the region. — Reuters

‘An environmental crime’ – millions of seahorses found on ship in Peru

UNTV News   •   October 4, 2019

In an operation at the port of Callao on Monday (September 30), Peruvian authorities seized some 12.3 million seahorses that were illegally caught and allegedly destined to be sold abroad, according to local reports.

The seahorses, of the Hippocampus ingens species which is protected by Peruvian regulations, were dried out and possibly destined to be sold for medicinal purposes in China according to local media.

Four crew members of the ship carrying the illegal contraband were detained by Peruvian authorities and will face charges of up to three to five years according to local media.

The millions of seahorses were stored within the ship in 55 boxes that weighed in at over one ton. (REUTERS)

(Production: Carlos Valdez)

104 new whale sharks spotted in Donsol, highest in several years

Aileen Cerrudo   •   September 6, 2019

A diver tags a whale shark off the coast Donsol as part of the local population count. 104 new whale shark individuals were identified in Donsol from January until June of 2019. (Photograph: Jurgen Freund / WWF Philippines)

There are 104 new whale sharks spotted on the coast of Donsol in Sorsogon between January and June 2019, according to the World Wildlife Fund (WWF).

This has been the highest number of whale sharks spotted compared to the period between 2017 and 2018, where only 22 new whale sharks were identified.

“Each whale shark can be identified based on the unique pattern of spots behind its gills, which serves as a “fingerprint” for identification. Just as no two human fingerprints are alike, no two whale sharks have the same spot pattern,” according to the WWF website.

The whale shark or Rhincodon typus is classified as endangered, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) on their Red List of Threatened Species.

“The whale sharks were sighted during this year’s photo identification activities conducted by WWF-Philippines. In the first half of this year, 168 individuals – with 64 re-sightings alongside the 104 newly identified ones – were noted,” the WWF added.

WWF-Philippines Donsol Project Manager Manuel Narvadez, Jr. said the increase in the number of new whale sharks spotted in Donsol is because the water is now rich in plankton.

“These whale sharks that pass by Donsol aren’t just important due to their value to local tourism. More than that, they play an important, systemic role in providing resilience to the local ecosystem,” he said.—AAC

Archaeologists in Peru unearth ancient mural reflecting on importance of water

Robie de Guzman   •   August 20, 2019

Archaeologists in northern Peru have unearthed an ancient mural from the lost Caral civilization that is believed to be about 3,800 years old, officials reported.

The discovery was made in the Vichama archaeological site. A team of excavators has brushed away earth from the mural to reveal figures that depict a toad that wraps its hands around the head of a man.

Archaeologist Tatiana Abad, told a news conference in Lima, the mural represents the “announcement of the arrival of water,” adding “it talks about the importance of water in times of crisis and the reflections that we can create from them.”

“It has been found in the same building as last year when we presented one about snakes and this would complement the message. The importance of this mural is its age, which is 3,800 years old, which talks about the importance of water in times of crisis and the reflections that we can create from them,” Abad said.

“It belongs to the late period of what would be the Caral civilization. Caral is 4,500 years old and this relief would’ve been built in the late period within the archaeological site of Vichama in the Huara Valley,” she added.

Excavations at Vichama have been ongoing since 2007 and continue to reveal new insights into the ancient civilization such as an advanced city plan and architecture.

The Caral is believed to be the oldest civilization in the Americas, dating as far back as 3,000 BCE. But little is still known of this ancient city. The site is currently in an arid region of Peru, leaving many to conclude that climate change may have played a role in its demise.

According to archaeologists, the civilization was mysteriously toppled at around 1,600 BCE. (Reuters)

(Production: Carlos Valdez)

REACH US

The Philippine Broadcast Hub

UNTV, 915 Barangay Philam,

EDSA, Quezon City M.M. 1104

(+632) 8396-8688 (Tel)

(+632) 8920.8336 (Fax)

info@untvweb.com (General inquiries)

support@untvweb.com

UNTV News and Rescue Emergency Hotlines:

LANDLINE (+632) 8396-8688

ADVERTISE WITH US

(+632) 8 442.6244 Loc. 143, 144, 162, 164

advertising@untvweb.com

ABOUT UNTV

UNTV is a major TV broadcast network with 24-hour programming. An Ultra High Frequency station with strong brand content that appeal to everyone, UNTV is one of the most trusted and successful Philippine networks that guarantees wholesome and quality viewing experience.