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Rabies vaccine in short supply—DOH

by UNTV News   |   Posted on Thursday, 7 March 2019 07:41 PM

Kinuskos ko ng bawang [ang sugat] (I just rubbed garlic on her wound),” Rose Ann Condeno said while cradling her daughter in her arms.

Her daughter was recently clawed by a stray cat while playing outside—she has not been vaccinated with anti-rabies.

According to the Department of Health (DOH) Undersecretary Eric Domingo, victims of rabies rarely survive and almost 100 percent of them die without receiving anti-rabies vaccine.

Rabies is a viral disease that can be passed from an animal to a human through biting or clawing. Rabies cases in the country often spike during vacation when children spend more time outside.

Victims of rabies usually get infected following a bite or a scratch from a rabid stray dog or cat on the street.

“Siyempre kapag bakasyon iyong mga bata, wala na sa eskwela, naglalaro maghapon, naglalaro sa kalye and then dito talaga tayo nagkakroon na dumadami ang cases ng nakakagat ng aso (Of course, during vacation, they are no longer in school. They will mostly play all afternoon. This is when cases of animal bite rise),” Domingo said.

The World Health Organization (WHO) reported that 40 percent of people bitten by suspect rabid animals are children under 15 years of age.

Condeno’s daughter, who is only 11 months old, did not experience any fever and appears to be in stable condition.

“May nagsabi nga sa akin na pa-injectionan siya, pero tinignan ko naman medyo mababaw, kaya naman na hindi siya nilagnat (Someone told me to get her vaccinated but I checked and the wound is not that deep. She did not experience any fever),” she adds.

The DOH said vaccination is a must because cleaning or using alternative medicines will not be enough to prevent the virus.

“Hindi pa rin tayo nakakasigurado siyempre, kailangan pa rin natin iyong anti-bodies na lalaban sa rabies (We cannot be sure, we still need the anti-bodies to fight rabies),” Domingo said.

However, the Health department laments the lack of supply of anti-rabies vaccine in the country.

In April last year, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported that supplies of human anti-rabies vaccines across the globe are contaminated.

With this, Domingo urges everyone to be more careful especially with children who has an open wound.

They can also suffer from rabies if they were licked by an animal without anti-rabies vaccine.

“We are asking everybody to be extra careful kasi talagang mayroon pa tayong shortage ng ating anti- rabies vaccines sa humans sa buong mundo (We are asking everybody to be extra careful because there is a global shortage of human anti-rabies vaccines),” he said. —Aileen Cerrudo (with reports from Aiko Miguel)

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DOH records 44,000 dengue cases, 167 deaths this year

by UNTV News   |   Posted on Monday, 25 March 2019 12:08 PM

QUEZON CITY, Philippines —The Department of Health (DOH)-Epidemiology Bureau has recorded 44,566 dengue cases from January 1 to March 9 this year, with 167 deaths.

This is almost half a percent higher compared to the 26,408 dengue cases reported during the same period last year.

The report adds, Central Visayas region has the most number of dengue cases with 4,956. The region also recorded 32 deaths which is also the highest number among the regions.

READ: Dengue cases in Zamboanga Peninsula up by 81%

Meanwhile, the National Capital Region (NCR) has 4,604 cases, followed by Calabarzon with 4,559; and Caraga with 4,350.

The health department reiterates the use of 4-S campaign to prevent dengue.—Aileen Cerrudo

4S Kontra Dengue by DOH Philippines#AntiDungue #4S #DOH

Posted by Community Newswatch PH on Tuesday, 9 January 2018

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DOH limits per patient’s watcher in hospitals hit by water shortage

by UNTV News   |   Posted on Friday, 15 March 2019 06:55 PM

A father watches over his child at a public hospital

MANILA, Philippines – The Department of Health (DOH) is looking to strictly implement a ‘one watcher, one patient’ policy in hospitals hit by the Manila Water supply shortage.

During a press conference at the National Kidney Institute of the Philippines (NKTI) in Quezon City on March 14, Health Secretary Francisco Duque III said a confined patient would only be allowed to have one visitor or watcher to minimize water use.

Duque appealed to patients and their kin to bear with the policy as hospital managements are prioritizing water use for critical care.

He added that this is just temporary given the current situation in parts of Metro Manila and Rizal Province.

Duque said they have identified five hospitals that are affected by the Manila Water’s supply issues. These are NKTI, the Rizal Medical Center in Pasig, the National Center for Mental Health in Mandaluyong, the Philippine Children’s Medical Center and the Quirino Memorial Medical Center in Quezon City.

Manila Water has earlier assured to prioritize hospitals in its distribution of water supply.

READ: Duque assures enough water supply in hospitals amid water shortage

Duque said hospitals can still sustain their current level of operations on just 50 percent of their average daily consumption.

Water is important for hospitals, such as the NKTI for its hospital operations and dialysis sessions.

READ: NKTI to use other dialysis method to cope with water shortage

NKTI earlier said they will be using peritoneal dialysis method which only requires around six liters of water, compared with hemodialysis which consumes 100 liters of water per session. — Robie de Guzman

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DOH: even a little water can serve as breeding ground for mosquitoes

by UNTV News   |   Posted on Friday, 15 March 2019 04:34 PM

The Department of Health (DOH) has raised concerns during the ongoing water shortage in Metro Manila and nearby areas especially with the increasing dengue cases in the country.

The recent report of DOH Epidemiology Bureau has recorded 40,614 dengue cases dengue cases from January 1 to March 2 which is 68% higher compared to the same period last year.

According to DOH Secretary Francisco Duque III, the water collected by residents can become breeding grounds for mosquitoes especially if it is not used immediately.

Duque encourages the public to use the 4-S strategy:

  • Search and destroy breeding places
  • Secure self-protection
  • Seek early consultation
  • Support spraying to prevent impending outbreak

“Pwedeng takpan ng plastic, talian sa may labi ng mga lalagyan at siguraduhin na ito’y hindi mapamugaran ng mga lamok. Doon ang kiti- kiti ay dadami, magiging lamok at sila ay magkakalat ng sakit sa dengue, [They can cover it with plastic and ensure that it will not become breeding grounds for mosquitoes because it can cause dengue],” he added. —Aileen Cerrudo

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