Public may ask PHIVOLCS if their area is transected by fault line

admin   •   June 3, 2015   •   4125

PHIVOLCS Geologist Jeffrey Cruz shows the different types of ground rupture.

QUEZON CITY, Philippines — The public may ask Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) for assessment of their area if it is hazardous or transected by fault line.

The possible dangers that may befall places transected by a fault line can be clearly seen from the photos presented by PHIVOLCS.

The initial danger from a movement on an active fault is ground rupture or surface rupture. This is when movement on a fault breaks through to the surface.

PHIVOLCS Geologist Jeffrey Perez said on demonstration of different ground ruptures documented from past big earthquakes struck in the country, “As what we saw in 1990 Luzon earthquake, this embankment was joined and aligned before the quake happened. After the quake, a rupture occurred with a length of 120 kilometers. And the horizontal displacement of the embankments in this area was 6 meters. ”

“Although coconut trees can withstand typhoons this one was no match for the magnitude 6.2 earthquake in Masbate in 2003.”

Another example was the Bohol earthquake in 2013 when it moved up a side of the ground by 2.5 meters.

It may also happen to the valley fault system that stretches across Bulacan, Metro Manila, Rizal, Cavite and Laguna.

The agency said, more people are expressing their interest after the valley fault system was launched.

PHIVOLCS is one of the government agencies mandated to issue environmental compliance certificate that is required by the LGU during building constructions.

If you want to be sure if your place is in the buffer zone of a fault line, you may ask PHIVOLCS for an assessment.

Just bring your property vicinity map, tittle or tax declaration and 100 pesos. (REY PELAYO / UNTV News)

For inquiries:
Address: PHIVOLCS Building, C.P. Garcia Avenue, U.P. Campus, Diliman Quezon City Philippines
E-mail: phivolcs_mail@phivolcs.dost.gov.ph; phivolcs.mail@gmail.com
Telephone: +632 426 1468 to 79
Fax: +632 929 8366, 927 4524
Official Website: http://www.phivolcs.dost.gov.ph

Phivolcs downgrades Quezon town quake to magnitude 5.3

Robie de Guzman   •   September 13, 2019

MANILA, Philippines – The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs) has downgraded the magnitude of an earthquake that hit Burdeos town in Quezon Province to magnitude 5.3 on Friday afternoon.

Phivolcs originally placed the magnitude at 5.5 before eventually revising it to 5.3.

Based on the latest earthquake information posted on Phivolcs website, the tectonic quake struck at 4:28 p.m. with a depth of 62 kilometers. Its epicenter was traced 39 kilometers northeast of Burdeos.

Phivolcs recorded varying quake intensities felt in the following areas:

  • Intensity 5 – Burdeos and Infanta, Quezon; Los Baños and Pakil, Laguna
  • Intensity 4 – Jose Panganiban, Camarines Norte; Quezon City; Marikina City; Sta. Cruz, Laguna; Alabat and Gen. Nakar, Quezon
  • Intensity 3 – Guinayangan, Quezon; Muntinlupa City; Manila City; San Jose Del Monte, Bulacan; Bacoor, Cavite; Maddela, Quirino; San Mateo, Rizal; Baler, Aurora; Lucena City
  • Intensity 2 – Dingalan, Aurora; Mandaluyong City; Apalit, Pampanga; Taguig City; Lucban, Quezon
  • Intensity 1 – San Isidro, Nueva Ecija; Gapan City; Meycauayan, Bulacan

Instrumental Intensity were recorded in the following areas:

  • Intensity 5 – Polillo, Quezon
  • Intensity 4 – Jose Panganiban, Camarines Norte; Quezon City; Alabat and Mauban, Quezon
  • Intensity 3 – Guinayangan, Quezon; Marikina City; Baler, Aurora; Tagaytay City; Quezon City; Navotas City
  • Intensity 2 – Mulanay, Lucban and Gumaca, Quezon; Malolos and San Ildefonso, Bulacan; Guagua, Pampanga; Las Pinas City; Pasig City; San Juan City; Caloocan City; Malabon City; Muntinlupa City; Calumpit, Bulacan
  • Intensity 1 – Talisay, Batangas; Olongapo City; San Jose, Nueva Ecija

Phivolcs said that due to the magnitude of this quake, the islands of Polillo, Jamalig, and Burdeos may suffer damages.

Aftershocks are also expected and may be felt in areas near the epicenter.

Based on earthquake information posted on Phivolcs website, aftershocks of varying magnitudes have been recorded: magnitude 2.4 at 5:02 p.m., magnitude 4.7 at 5:18 p.m., magnitude 2.9 at 5:20 pm.; and magnitude 1.5 at 6:27 p.m. – All were felt in Burdeos, Quezon.

The temblor caused the temporary suspension of railway services and classes in several schools in Metro Manila.

PHIVOLCS: Damaged structures in Itbayat may have used porous limestone

Marje Pelayo   •   July 31, 2019

Photo by Dominic de Sagon Asa

MANILA, Philippines – The municipality of Itbayat and other island towns in the province of Batanes in Northern Luzon are landmasses that emerged from the ocean, according to the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS).

The area’s soil composition manifests its origin, according to Science and Technology USec. Renato Solidum.

“Doon sa Itbayat ang makikita mong mas maraming bato doon ay limestone (You notice in Itbayat, most of the stones there are limestone),” the PHIVOLCS Director said.

“Ang limestones ay galing sa corals na namuhay sa ilalim ng tubig. Kaya lang napapaangat ito dahil sa pagkilos ng fault, (Limestones are formed from corals on the sea bed. They surface to the ground when the fault moves),” he added.

In July 27, a series of three moderately strong earthquakes rocked the municipality of Itbayat – magnitudes 5.4, 5.9 and 5.8, respectively.

It was in 2015 when Itbayat experienced its latest intensity 5 tremor.

But after 60 or 70 years, it was only on Saturday (July 27) that intensity 6 was again experienced in the area.

According to Solidum, most of the houses or structures suffered damages because the materials used in their constructions were mostly limestone.

Though limestone-based structures could stand strong tropical cyclones, they couldn’t hold strong against earthquakes.

Also, some structures had no steel frames that supposedly add strength and resilience.

“Dahil ang limestone ay madaling matunaw o naaagnas habang tumatagal dahil sa ulan, nagiging marupok ang limestone, (Limestone is a porous material and easily absorbs liquid when drenched in rainwater. Limestone easily breaks),” Usec. Solidum explained.

Limestone was also traced in old churches that were destroyed during a magnitude 7.2 earthquake that struck the province of Bohol in 2013.

Other structures that were damaged also showed traces of limestone that’s why they were not able to stand the strength of the tremors. – (MNP with reports from Rey Pelayo)

Know possible hazards in your area with web app ‘Hazard Hunter’

Marje Pelayo   •   July 16, 2019

MANILA, Philippines – Want to know potential hazards within your area?

The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) on Tuesday (July 16) launched a web application dubbed as ‘Hazard Hunter’ which provides the public with information on the possible dangers that may happen in a specific area like earthquake, flood or even volcanic eruption.

‘Hazard Hunter’ is a web-based application that can be accessed on desktop, laptop or in smart phones.

To access, just load https://hazardhunter.georisk.gov.ph/ on your web browser.

A welcome message will lead you to the Hazard Hunter official page.

You will be asked to proceed until you see the full map of the Philippines.

Click on the menu bar then several options on the type of hazards that may be present in your area will appear – seismic for earthquakes, volcanic for volcanoes and hydro-meteorological for flood and storm-related hazards.

Click on the type of hazard then select an area by pointing the cursor to the place of inquiry on the map.

Double click on the area of choice.

The system will immediately load the results that will flash on the right side of the screen.

For instance, Baseco compound in Manila has a population of about 60,000 people.

Based on the app’s reading, Baseco is about 12 kilometers away from the West Valley Fault.

Residents in Baseco may feel ground shaking of up to intensity 8 once the West Valley Fault moves in an event called the Big One.

The area is prone to liquefaction and could suffer from up to four-meter-high tsunami as it is near Manila Bay.

Based on the app, Baseco is less likely to be affected if ever the nearest active volcano, Mount Taal in Batangas, erupts.

Taal Lake is about 58 kilometers away from Baseco.

Baseco is a flood-prone area and floodwater can go as high as two meters and can take up to three days to subside.

During the onset of a severe tropical cyclone, the area could suffer from storm surge as high as 4 meters.

But there is no possibility of a landslide in the area.

The app also has detailed recommendations or suggestions for a plan of action during a specific hazard.

Science and Technology Undersecretary and PHIVOLCS OIC Renato Solidum believes ‘Hazard Hunter’ will enable the public to prepare and plan ahead of a natural disaster.

Government agencies will also be guided for appropriate actions to be taken to minimize or prevent the loss of lives and damage to properties.

“Hindi naman masama na may hazards diyan. What is important is that the hazard is recognized so that the developer can develop approaches to lessen the impact, to mitigate the possible impact,” Solidum noted.

Solidum said even his own house sits on a location that is hazard-prone but recognizing the dangers enabled him to plan for his and his family’s protection.

“Tinaasan ko yung bahay. Ginawa kong three floors para hindi ako mamatay sa baha (What I did was I elevated my house. I made it into three floors to keep me safe from the flood),” he said.

“Inayos ko yung foundation ng building para sa shaking ng liquefaction. So mga ganung klaseng real life application magagamit (ang Hazard Hunter) (I aligned the foundation of the building in case of shaking during liquefaction. During those real-life applications, [Hazard Hunter] can be useful),” he added.

Before the end of the year, PHIVOLCS plans to launch the mobile version of the website. – with details from Rey Pelayo

REACH US

The Philippine Broadcast Hub

UNTV, 915 Barangay Philam,

EDSA, Quezon City M.M. 1104

(+63) 396-8688 (Tel)

(+63) 2 920.8336 (Fax)

info@untvweb.com (General inquiries)

support@untvweb.com

UNTV News and Rescue Emergency Hotlines:

LANDLINE (+63) 396-8688

ADVERTISE WITH US

(+63) 2 442.6244 Loc. 143, 144, 162, 164

advertising@untvweb.com

ABOUT UNTV

UNTV is a major TV broadcast network with 24-hour programming. An Ultra High Frequency station with strong brand content that appeal to everyone, UNTV is one of the most trusted and successful Philippine networks that guarantees wholesome and quality viewing experience.