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    HMD Global launches first Nokia smartphone

    by UNTV News   |   Posted on Monday, January 9th, 2017

    A new Nokia 6 smartphone is seen in this handout image released by HMD to Reuters on January 7, 2017. HMD/Handout via Reuters

    HMD Global, the Finnish company that owns the rights to use Nokia’s brand on mobile phones, announced on Sunday its first smartphone, targeted for Chinese users with a price of 1,699 yuan ($246).

    The launch marks the first new smartphone carrying the iconic handset name since 2014 when Nokia Oyj (NOKIA.HE) chose to sell its entire handset unit to Microsoft (MSFT.O).

    The new device, Nokia 6, runs on Google’s (GOOGL.O) Android platform and is manufactured by Foxconn (2354.TW). It will be sold exclusively in China through online retailer JD.com (JD.O), HMD said.

    “The decision by HMD to launch its first Android smartphone into China is a reflection of the desire to meet the real world needs of consumers in different markets around the world… it is a strategically important market,” HMD said in a statement.

    Nokia was once the world’s dominant cellphone maker but missed the shift to smartphones, and then chose Microsoft’s Windows operating system for its “Lumia” range.

    After the 2014 deal, Microsoft continued selling cheaper basic phones under Nokia’s name and Lumia smartphones under its own name, but last year, it largely abandoned both businesses.

    HMD in December took over the Nokia feature phones business and struck a licensing deal that gave it sole use of the Nokia brand on all phones and tablets for the next decade.

    It will pay Nokia royalties for the brand and patents, but Nokia has no direct investment in HMD. Nokia Oyj is currently focused on telecom network equipment business and technology patents.

    HMD CEO Arto Nummela, who was once responsible for Nokia’s sales and product development, told Reuters last month that HMD aims to be one of the key competitive players in the smartphone business where it faces tough competition from Apple (AAPL.O), Samsung (005930.KS) and dozens of other players.

    HMD launched some new Nokia basic phones last month. It said on Sunday it was looking to launch more new products in the first half of the year.

    (Reporting by Jussi Rosendahl and Eric Auchard)

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    Why parents’ tech obsession may mean kids misbehave

    by UNTV News   |   Posted on Friday, June 2nd, 2017

    FILE PHOTO: A man uses a smartphone in New York City, in this picture taken November 6, 2013. REUTERS/Mike Segar

    (Reuters Health) – Parents who are constantly checking their phones for texts, emails and cat videos may be more likely to have kids who misbehave than people who are able to step away from their screens, a small U.S. study suggests.

    Researchers examined survey data from parents in 170 families with young children and found mothers and fathers who were more likely to report being distracted by technology during playtime were also more likely to see behavior problems in their kids.

    “Prior studies have shown us that some parents can be quite absorbed by their devices and that when they are absorbed it seems like it is difficult for children to get their attention,” said lead study author Brandon McDaniel of Illinois State University in Normal.

    “No prior studies however had linked parent technology use, especially use that interrupts or interferes with parent-child interactions, with child behavior problems specifically,” McDaniel added by email. “What is especially new here is that even minor, everyday intrusions of technology that are likely happening to all of us that have and use smartphones can begin to influence our children’s behavior.”

    For the study, researchers analyzed data from surveys completed separately by 168 mothers and 165 fathers from two-parent households.

    Among other things, the surveys asked about how often smartphones, tablets, laptops and other technology disrupted family time with interruptions like checking phone messages during meals or answering texts in the middle of conversations. Parents were also asked to rate how problematic their personal device use was based on how often they worried about calls or texts and whether they thought they used mobile devices too much.

    While both mothers and fathers thought technology use distracted from interactions with their children at least once a day, the women perceived their phone use as a bigger parenting problem than the men.

    About 48 percent of parents reported technology interruptions at least three times a day, while 24 percent said this happened twice a day and 17 percent said it occurred once daily. Only 11 percent said technology never interrupted family time, the study team reports in Child Development.

    Researchers also asked parents to rate the frequency of child behavior issues within the past two months by answering questions about how often their children whined, sulked, easily got frustrated, had tantrums or showed signs of hyperactivity or restlessness.

    After adjusting for other factors that can influence kids’ behavior such as parent income and education level and other family dynamics, researchers found an association between parents’ belief that their technology use was disruptive and parents reporting that kids had behavior issues like tantrums, whining or hyperactivity.

    The study wasn’t a controlled experiment designed to prove how or if parents’ technology use changes the way kids behave. Other limitations include the lack of clinical data or reports from teachers or other adults to verify that kids had behavior problems.

    It’s also possible that parents who turn to technology more often during family time are doing this to take a break from kids with behavior issues, said Dr. Sam Wass, a developmental psychologist at the University of East London in the UK who wasn’t involved in the study.

    “It could be that children who are naturally more restless or hyperactive are more likely to have parents who ‘need a break’ from their children from time to time – and it is this that causes the association,” Wass said by email. “This link is very far from proven.”

    Still, parents worried about how technology disrupts their family time can try to carve out periods of each day when the devices go away and they focus only on their kids, said Larry Rosen, professor emeritus at California State University, Dominguez Hills.

    “Children crave a connection to their parents and learn from their parents’ behaviors,” Rosen, who wasn’t involved in the study, said by email. “Constantly checking your phone is going to have a negative impact on this connection.” — By Lisa Rapaport

    SOURCE: bit.ly/2rciUsr Child Development, online May 10, 2017.

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    Samsung Electronics to reveal Galaxy Note 7 probe results ‘very soon’

    by UNTV News   |   Posted on Friday, January 6th, 2017

    File photo.

    File photo.

    Samsung Electronics America’s President and Chief Operating Officer Tim Baxter said on Wednesday the South Korean company was doing everything to make sure the problems with the Galaxy Note 7 do not reoccur and said the results of a probe into the smartphone fires will be made public ‘very soon.’

    “As you know, this year was a challenging year for Samsung. Some of you were directly impacted and certainly many saw the media coverage, especially about the Note 7. We continue our intensive efforts, internally and with third party experts to understand what happened and to make sure it does not happen again. And very soon we will be sharing the root cause report on the Note 7,” Baxter said.

    It was reported on Monday that Samsung would announce, this month, the results of an investigation into what caused some of its Galaxy Note 7 smartphones to catch fire.

    The South Korean firm said in October it was examining all aspects of the phone, suggesting there may be a combination of factors that contributed to one of the costliest product safety failures in tech history.

    The world’s top smartphone maker warned of a $5.1 billion hit to its operating profit over three quarters following its decision to permanently halt Galaxy Note 7 sales in October.

    Investors and analysts have said it is critical for Samsung to identify the root cause of the fires in order to rebuild consumer trust and avoid repeating the same mistakes. — Ninya Armillo | UNTV News & Rescue

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    Nokia sues Apple for infringing patents, industry back on war footing

    by UNTV News   |   Posted on Thursday, December 22nd, 2016

    Headquarters of Finnish telecommunication network company Nokia are pictured in Espoo, Finland August 4, 2016. Lehtikuva/Irene Stachon/via REUTERS

    Nokia Corp. said on Wednesday it had filed a number of lawsuits against Apple Inc. for violating 32 technology patents, striking back at the iPhone maker’s legal action targeting the one-time cellphone industry leader a day earlier.

    Nokia’s lawsuits, filed in courts in Dusseldorf, Mannheim and Munich, Germany, and the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, cover patents for displays, user interfaces, software, antennas, chipsets and video coding.

    “Since agreeing a license covering some patents from the Nokia Technologies portfolio in 2011, Apple has declined subsequent offers made by Nokia to license other of its patented inventions which are used by many of Apple’s products,” Nokia said in a statement.

    Apple on Tuesday had taken legal action against Acacia Research Corp. and Conversant Intellectual Property Management Inc., accusing them of colluding with Nokia to extract and extort exorbitant revenues unfairly from Apple.

    “We’ve always been willing to pay a fair price to secure the rights of patents covering technology in our products,” said Apple spokesman Josh Rosenstock. “Unfortunately, Nokia has refused to license their patents on a fair basis and is now using the tactics of a patent troll to attempt to extort money from Apple by applying a royalty rate to Apple’s own inventions they had nothing to do with.”

    Acacia and Conversant did not immediately respond to requests for comment, and Nokia was not immediately available to comment on the Apple lawsuit.

    The legal action by Nokia and Apple appear to mark a revival of the “smartphone patent wars” that began five years ago, when Apple filed a series of patent infringement cases against Samsung Electronics around the world, with wins and losses on both sides.

    Apple’s lawsuit against Acacia, Conversant and Nokia was filed only one day after Ottawa-based Conversant named Boris Teksler as its new chief executive. He had worked as Apple’s director of patent licensing and strategy from 2009 to 2013, the latter half of his tenure overlapping with the lawsuits against Samsung.

    Acacia is a publicly traded patent licensing firm based in Newport Beach, California. One of its subsidiaries sued Apple for patent infringement and was awarded $22 million by a Texas jury in September.

    Similarly, Conversant, which claims to own thousands of patents, announced last week that a Silicon Valley jury had awarded one of its units a $7.3 million settlement in an infringement case against Apple involving two smartphone patents.

    Nokia, once the world’s dominant cellphone maker, missed out on the transition to smartphones triggered by Apple’s introduction of the iPhone in 2007.

    The Finnish company sold its handset business to Microsoft Corp. two years ago, leaving it with its telecom network equipment business and a bulging portfolio of mobile equipment patents.

    But this year, Microsoft sold its Nokia-feature phone business to a new company called HMD Global.

    Nokia agreed to a 10-year licensing deal with HMD, which continues to market low-cost Nokia phones and plans to introduce new Nokia smartphone models next year. — Reuters

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