Don’t forget to catch the Leonid meteor shower this weekend

Aileen Cerrudo   •   November 15, 2019   •   742

If you missed the Orionids meteor shower last October, or you were not able to catch one meteor during your “star gazing”, then worry not. The Leonid meteor shower will peak this weekend, November 16-17.

READ: Netizens share their Orionids meteor shower experience

Since it’s the weekend, hopefully, you won’t have to worry about your classmates or colleagues seeing your eyebags.

The Leonid meteor shower is active from November 6-30 and will peak in the late hours of November 17 until dawn, according to PAGASA.

A zenithal hourly rate (ZHR) of about 15 meteors might occur during the peak hours of the meteor shower.

Unfortunately, PAGASA said the waning gibbous Moon will interfere with the observations of fainter meteors.

“The Leonids Meteor Shower is created by bits of debris left behind by the repeat passages through the inner solar system of comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle,” according to PAGASA.

Where’s the best place to view meteor showers?

READ: Tara drawing tayo! Ways to make your long weekend memorable

It is always best to view the night sky in high places like in the mountains or rooftops. Less light pollution is also better because too much city or street lights can overpower the light in the night sky.—AAC

LOOK: The last supermoon of 2020

Aileen Cerrudo   •   May 8, 2020

People across the globe witnessed the last supermoon of 2020.

The supermoon, which is also called as the flower moon, occurred on Thursday (May 7). According to PAGASA, the moon is at its nearest distance to the Earth.

Several netizens posted their own shots of the supermoon.

Don’t miss the peak of the Eta Aquarid meteor shower on May 6

Aileen Cerrudo   •   May 5, 2020

Stargazers will have another opportunity to witness a meteor shower as the Eta Aquarid begins its peak on Tuesday (May 5) until 3:00 a.m. on Wednesday (May 6).

The Eta Aquarid is a result of the Earth’s passing close to the orbit of Halley’s comet twice a year, according to Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA).

Courtesy PAGASA

PAGASA also said the meteor shower is best observed a few hours before dawn and is more favorable to southern hemisphere viewers.

“In the Northern Hemisphere, about 20 or more meteors per hour at the pre-dawn sky of May 6 may be seen,” PAGASA said. “The point from where the meteors appear to radiate is located within the constellation Aquarius, the Water Bearer.” AAC

Stargazers watch peak of Lyrid meteor shower

Aileen Cerrudo   •   April 23, 2020

People looked up to skies on Wednesday (April 22) to witness the peak of the Lyrid meteor shower.

According to the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA), Lyrids are bright and fast meteors that are active from April 16 to 25 every year.

Several stargazers were able to witness this spectacle while others just enjoyed watching the stars.

“The Lyrid meteor shower has been observed for more than 2,600 years. Chinese records show that ‘stars fell like rain’ during the meteor shower of 687 B.C.,” according to PAGASA.

However, they also reported that in recent times, the Lyrids have generally been weak.

“The shower typically generates a dozen meteors per hour under optimal conditions with a brief maximum that lasts for less than a day,” PAGASA stated. AAC

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