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China tells U.S. ‘now is the time’ if it wants peace with N. Korea

by UNTV News   |   Posted on Thursday, May 24th, 2018

China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi and U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo hold a joint news conference after their meeting at the State Department in Washington, U.S., May 23, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

A senior Chinese official told the United States on Wednesday (May 23) if it wants peace with North Korea now is the time for a summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

“I told our U.S. colleagues that if you want to solve the problem, now is the time. If you want peace, now is the time. If you want to make history, now is the time,” Chinese State Councillor Wang Yi told a news conference with U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

In an unrelated incident, news an American citizen working at the U.S. consulate in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou has reported suffering from “abnormal” sounds and pressure leading to a mild brain injury, the U.S. embassy said.

The embassy, which issued a health alert to Americans living in China, said it could not link the case to health issues suffered by U.S. government staff in Cuba dating back to late 2016.

In Washington, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the United States was concerned about the “serious medical incident” and raised it with China’s visiting State Councillor Wang Yi.

“We notified China of what took place as best we know it and they have responded in a way that is exactly the right response,” Pompeo told a news conference with Wang. “We’re working together to resolve (this) … I hope we can figure it out.”

The unnamed American citizen assigned to the consulate in Guangzhou had reported a variety of “physical symptoms” dating from late 2017 to April this year, the U.S. embassy in Beijing said in an email.

The worker was sent to the United States for further evaluation. “The clinical findings of this evaluation matched mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI),” the embassy said.

The U.S. government in October expelled 15 Cuban diplomats from the United States for what it said was Cuba’s failure to protect staff at the U.S. embassy in Havana from mysterious health incidents at one point thought to possibly have been acoustic “attacks”. — Reuters

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China’s new Alzheimer’s drug completes phase 3 clinical trial

by UNTV News   |   Posted on Wednesday, July 18th, 2018

 

China’s new Alzheimer’s drug GV-971. CCTV via Reuters

A Chinese research group on Tuesday announced that a new drug to treat Alzheimer’s disease completed its third clinical trial.

The drug GV-971, extracted from brown algae, was developed by Ocean University of China, the Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica under the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Green Valley Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd, after a 21-year study.

A phase three clinical trial is the last test before a drug reaches the market. For this drug, the test examined its effectiveness and safety in treating patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s.

Independent animal experiments showed that the new drug can regulate patients’ immune systems, reduce neuroinflammation and improve cognition.

Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that slowly destroys memory, thinking skills and the ability to carry out simple tasks. The disease affects about 48 million people worldwide, and the number is expected to increase with aging populations. -Reuters

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Trump tries to calm political storm over Putin summit, says he misspoke

by UNTV News   |   Posted on Wednesday, July 18th, 2018

 

 

U.S. President Donald Trump. REUTERS/Leah Millis

U.S. President Donald Trump tried on Tuesday (July 17) to calm a storm over his failure to hold Russian President Vladimir Putin accountable for meddling in the 2016 U.S. election, saying he misspoke in a joint news conference in Helsinki on Monday.

Trump stunned the world by shying away from criticizing the Russian leader for Moscow’s actions to undermine the election and cast doubt on U.S. intelligence agencies, prompting calls by some U.S. lawmakers for tougher sanctions and other actions to punish Russia.

“I said the word ‘would’ instead of ‘wouldn’t,'” Trump told reporters at the White House, more than 24 hours after his appearance with Putin. “The sentence should have been, ‘I don’t see any reason why it wouldn’t be Russia.'”

Trump, who had been given numerous opportunities to publicly rebuke Putin in Helsinki, praised the Russian leader during the news conference for his “strong and powerful” denial of the conclusions of U.S. intelligence agencies that the Russian state meddled in the election.

Although he faced pressure from critics, allied countries and even his own staff to take a tough line, Trump spoke not a single disparaging word in public about Moscow on any of the issues that have brought relations between the two nuclear powers to the lowest ebb since the Cold War.

The political firestorm over his performance at the Helsinki news conference has engulfed the administration and spread to his fellow Republicans, eclipsing most of the frequent controversies that have erupted during Trump’s turbulent 18 months in office. -Reuters

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For Putin, Helsinki talks with Trump a win before he even sits down

by UNTV News   |   Posted on Monday, July 16th, 2018

FILE PHOTO: Russia’s President Vladimir Putin talks to U.S. President Donald Trump during their bilateral meeting at the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, July 7, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria/File Photo

For U.S. President Donald Trump, a summit with Vladimir Putin risks a political backlash at home and abroad. For the Russian president, however, the fact the summit is even happening is already a big geopolitical win.

Despite Russia’s semi-pariah status among some Americans and U.S. allies, the Kremlin has long been trying to arrange a summit, betting that Putin and Trump will get on well and stop a sharp downward spiral in bilateral ties.

While nobody on either side expects big breakthroughs, including on U.S. sanctions, the summit is seen by Moscow as U.S. recognition of Russia’s status as a great power and an overdue U.S. realization that its interests must be taken into account.

It communicates that the “President of the United States is treating us with the respect that we deserve,” said David Szakonyi, a professor of political science at George Washington University.

“Even if no other type of agreements come out of it…just that handshake and that smile and that respect gives him (Putin) huge dividends, huge benefits for the many audiences that he plays to,” Szakonyi said.

Western grievances over Russia’s annexation of Crimea, its backing of pro-Russian separatists in Ukraine and its support for Syria’s Bashar al-Assad haven’t gone away. Other accusations, denied by Moscow, include that it meddled in U.S. and European politics, supplied the weapon that shot down a passenger plane in 2014 over Ukraine and tried to kill a former Russian spy in Britain with a nerve agent.

Expectations are high in Russia that Putin, with more than 18 years of global experience, will have the edge on Trump, who had not held elected office before he was inaugurated last year. The two men have met twice before at other events and spoken by phone at least eight times. -Reuters

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