Americans excited over Clinton-Trump debate

admin   •   September 27, 2016   •   3043

image_sept-26-2016_untv-news_hillary-clinton-donald-trump-debate

 

The debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will focus on security, progress and prosperity of the country, but experts are also anticipating a showdown from both candidates.

Clinton is said to be in a thorough rehearsal and mastering every policy detail while Republican rival Trump, knowing his character, is expected to be doing a more freewheeling approach.

Despite controversies throwing at both camps, many still prefer to watch the much awaited debate.

“This debate coming up on Monday, It’s a different animal. It’s not necessarily a test on who has better ideas, who knows the issues better, who has more experience. In a way, you can wipe a lot of that off the table and it’s a test of who’s more cool, calm and collected. And I think that’s what makes it for such great television,” said former White House speech writer and professor Eric Schnure.

The TV audience for the debate is expected to be a record according to the Nielsen Ratings Company. Many tourists outside the White House said they would definitely be watching though they express different sentiments.

One voter from Kansas says he was looking for both candidates to bring some “normalcy” to the race.

“I think that would reflect better with my values and what I stand for. That’s who probably would get my vote,” said Marc Rundell.

Monday’s debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York will be the first of three between the White House rivals.

It presents a major opportunity for them to appeal to voters who have yet to commit to a candidate after a mostly negative race in which Clinton and Trump have sought to brand each other as untrustworthy and dangerous for the country.

Global citizens closely follow every inch of the US presidential election being aware of the enormous influence the United States wields throughout the world. No one can predict of the results until it is revealed in November. — James Bontuyan | UNTV News & Rescue

Trump’s impeachment trial in Senate officially begins

UNTV News   •   January 17, 2020

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (Front L) and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler (Front R) lead impeachment managers walking to the Senate chamber before being sworn-in at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on 16 January 2020. The Senate impeachment trial of US President Donald J. Trump started with the reading of the articles of impeachment on the Senate floor by House managers and the swearing-in of Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts and senators. The trial is to get under way in earnest on 21 January 2020. EPA-EFE/MICHAEL REYNOLDS

Washington – The impeachment trial of President Donald Trump officially kicked off on Thursday in the Senate with the reading of the charges that the United States’ lower house approved last month.

Substantial trial proceedings, however, will not begin until Tuesday afternoon.

The chairman of the House of Representatives’ Intelligence Committee, Adam Schiff (D-CA), who will head a group of seven House managers prosecuting the case, was tasked with reading the two articles of impeachment to the members of the Republican-controlled Senate.

The first charge of “abuse of power” states that Trump used the power of his office to solicit “the interference of a foreign government, Ukraine, in the 2020 United States presidential election.”

That accusation stems from an allegation that during a phone call last July Trump sought personal political gain by improperly pressuring Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to publicly announce an investigation into the alleged interference years ago of US former Vice President Joe Biden, a leading contender for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, in a probe of his son Hunter’s business dealings in Ukraine.

The lower house found that Trump also improperly pushed Ukraine to publicly announce an investigation into a “discredited theory promoted by Russia alleging that Ukraine – rather than Russia – interfered in the 2016 United States presidential election.”

The House alleges that Trump exerted pressure by freezing nearly $400 million of US military and security aid to Ukraine about a week before he talked to Zelensky and delaying a head of state meeting between the two leaders at the White House.

Trump, who says the aid – eventually released on Sept. 11 – was withheld due to his frustration with what he considered to be an insufficient amount of monetary assistance provided to Ukraine by other countries, says the rough transcript of the phone call that the White House released on Sept. 25 shows he did nothing wrong.

The second article of impeachment accuses the president of “obstruction of Congress,” for directing executive branch agencies, offices and officials not to comply with subpoenas seeking documents and testimony deemed vital to the House’s inquiry.

Trump and his supporters say the constitution gives presidents broad constitutional grounds for resisting such demands from the legislative branch for privileged executive material unless a court compels them to produce it.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi had delayed sending over the charges under the argument that she first needed to know what rules would govern the Senate trial.

Democrats say a fair trial can only be assured if the senators, who will act as jury in the impeachment case, hear from witnesses who did not testify during the proceedings in the House. It still remains to be seen whether 51 senators will vote to do so.

Since the approval of the impeachment articles, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has proposed a procedure modeled on the one the Senate followed in 1998 during the impeachment of Democratic President Bill Clinton.

On that occasion, senators listened to presentations from the prosecution and the defense before holding a vote on whether to call witnesses.

On Thursday afternoon, Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts was sworn in to oversee the impeachment trial. He then proceeded to swear in all 100 senators – 53 Republicans, 45 Democrats and two independents (who caucus with the Democrats) – as jurors for the proceedings.

Trump is only the third US president to be impeached.

Both Andrew Johnson – in 1868 – and Clinton were acquitted in the Senate, while Richard Nixon resigned in 1974 before the lower house could vote on his impeachment.

Under the Constitution, the approval of articles of impeachment in the House is to be followed by a trial in the Senate, where it takes a two-thirds majority to remove the president from office.

Due to Republicans’ control of that upper chamber, a conviction is considered highly unlikely. EFE-EPA

ssa/mc

House Democrats deliver Trump impeachment articles to Senate

UNTV News   •   January 16, 2020

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi signs the articles of impeachment prior to their being walked across the Capitol to the Senate in Washington on Wednesday, 15 January 2020. EFE-EPA/SHAWN THEW

Washington – Articles of impeachment against Donald Trump were transmitted to the US Senate on Wednesday nearly a month after the Democratic-controlled House of Representatives voted to charge the Republican president with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

The seven “impeachment managers” appointed earlier Wednesday by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to prosecute the case carried the documents across the Capitol to the Senate.

The Senate majority leader, Kentucky Republican Mitch McConnell, invited the managers to return to the chamber at 12.00 pm Thursday to read the articles of impeachment aloud.

Following the reading of the articles, Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts is to be sworn-in as the temporary president of the Senate for the duration of the impeachment proceedings.

Roberts will then swear-in the 100 senators as jurors in preparation for the trial, set to begin Tuesday, when the Senate will re-convene after the Jan. 20 holiday honoring civil rights leader Martin Luther King.

“This is a difficult time for our country – but this is precisely the kind of time for which the framers created the Senate. I’m confident this body can rise above short-termism and factional fever, and serve the long-term best interests of our nation,” McConnell said.

“We can do this. And we must,” the majority leader said.

During an earlier signing ceremony, Pelosi said that the House was acting in accord with its “constitutional duty.”

“Today, we will make history, when we walk down – when the managers walk the hall, they will cross a threshold in history, delivering articles of impeachment against the president of the United States for abuse of power and obstruction of the House,” she said.

“This president will be held accountable,” the California Democrat said hours after the House voted 224-190 vote to send the impeachment articles to the Senate.

Pelosi selected Democrats Adam Schiff, Jerry Nadler, Hakeem Jeffries, Zoe Lofgren, Val Demings, Jason Crow and Silvia Garcia as the impeachment managers.

“The emphasis is on litigators,” Pelosi told reporters. “The emphasis is on comfort level in the courtroom.”

Republicans hold 53 seats in the Senate, where a two-thirds majority would be required to convict Trump and remove him from office.

Pelosi held back on sending the articles to the Senate because she wanted Republicans there to guarantee that they would allow new witnesses to be called in the trial, including former National Security Adviser John Bolton and Trump’s current acting chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney.

McConnell, however, wants an expedited process culminating in an all but inevitable acquittal.

Trump is only the third president in history to be impeached after Andrew Johnson in 1868 and Bill Clinton in 1998-99, both of whom were acquitted.

The case against Trump unfolded after a complaint by a whistleblower from the intelligence community regarding a telephone call in July 2019 between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, in which the US leader – in exchange for releasing some $400 million in military aid to Ukraine and setting up a coveted White House meeting for Zelensky – pressured the Ukrainian to investigate Biden for corruption although no evidence seems to exist on that score.

Trump, however, has consistently claimed that he did nothing wrong and virtually all Republican lawmakers have toed the party line that insufficient evidence of wrongdoing to justify impeachment and removal from office was gathered by House Democrats in their impeachment investigation.

Meanwhile, Trump prohibited administration officials who have inside knowledge of the activities and motivations surrounding the phone call with Zelensky from testifying before the House and also denied Democrats access to documents that might shed light on the matter, and this stonewalling resulted in the passage of the impeachment article regarding obstruction of Congress in its oversight responsibility. EFE

llb-afs/bp-dr

Pelosi not ready to send Trump impeachment articles to Senate

UNTV News   •   January 10, 2020

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (2-R) signs the Securing American Nonprofit Organizations Against Terrorism Act of 2019 as Representatives Bennie Thompson (2-L), Bill Pascrell (R) and Donald Payne Jr. (L) watch at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, USA, 09 January 2020. The bill is meant to protect houses of worship.

Washington – Speaker Nancy Pelosi declined Thursday to say when she will formally submit to the US Senate the two articles of impeachment the US House of Representatives approved against President Donald Trump.

“No, I’m not holding them indefinitely. I will turn them over when I’m ready, and that will probably be soon,” the leader of the Democratic-controlled House said during a press conference at the Capitol.

Under the Constitution, the approval of articles of impeachment in the House is to be followed by a trial in the Senate, where it takes a two-thirds majority to remove the president from office.

Trump’s fellow Republicans hold 53 of the 100 seats in the upper chamber, making a conviction in the Senate highly unlikely.

Minutes after the House approved the articles of impeachment on Dec. 18, Pelosi said she would not relay them to the Senate without assurances from Majority Leader Mitch McConnell that the trial would be “fair.”

The House speaker justified her position by pointing to statements from the Kentucky Republican indicating that he wanted a brief, expedited trial with no witnesses.

McConnell has since proposed a procedure modeled on the one the Senate followed in 1998 during the impeachment of Democratic President Bill Clinton.

On that occasion, senators listened to presentations from the prosecution and the defense before holding a vote on whether to call witnesses.

Senate Republicans have the votes to approve McConnell’s plan and conduct the trial on that basis.

While Trump and other Republicans have been critical from the start of Pelosi’s decision to withhold the articles of impeachment, recent days have seen Democrats express doubts about the speaker’s approach.

“The longer it goes on the less urgent it becomes,” Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) said Wednesday. “So if it’s serious and urgent, send them over. If it isn’t, don’t send it over.”

By Thursday, however, Feinstein had softened her tone, telling NBC News: “I mean, we have plenty to do, and the speaker will send them (the impeachment articles) over when she’s ready to send them over.”

McConnell took the opportunity to gloat about signs of dissent in the Democratic ranks.

“This is a challenging time to create bipartisan agreement,” the Senate majority leader said on Twitter. “But Speaker Pelosi has managed to do the impossible. She has created growing bipartisan unity – in opposition to her own reckless games with impeachment.”

The House voted to impeach Trump on two accusations: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

The abuse of power charge stems from an allegation that Trump sought personal political gain by improperly pressuring Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to publicly announce a corruption investigation into US former Vice President Joe Biden, a leading contender for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, and his son Hunter.

Representatives also approved a charge that Trump obstructed the House impeachment inquiry by blocking officials from testifying and preventing the sharing of documents with Congress.

Trump is only the third US president to be impeached.

Both Andrew Johnson – in 1868 – and Clinton were acquitted in the Senate, while Richard Nixon resigned in 1974 before the lower house could vote on his impeachment. EFE

afs/dr

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